Tuesday, April 19, 2016

New project getting started on West La. in downtown Bethesda (Photos)

Heavy equipment is being positioned on West Lane in downtown Bethesda, as a demolition team gets ready to knock down four single-family homes on this tiny street off of Montgomery Lane. They will be replaced by a 120-unit, seven-story residential building at 4831 West Lane. That project will include 15% affordable units.

The developer of the project is SJG Residential. As you can see in the photos, they have applied for the demolition permits.









On the left ahead is
4825 Montgomery La.,
a recent condominium
addition that appears to
have pre-sold its 4 units

35 comments:

Anonymous said...

Nice to get some density so close to metro.

Anonymous said...

The standard abbreviation for Lane is Ln not La.

Anonymous said...

Not harping on Dyer but yeah I was very briefly confused by the headline because of La. Vs Ln. Why is dyer writing about California? Lol. Figured out quick enough but still odd.

Anonymous said...

Imagine Westbard once the shopping center is redeveloped, and then they start tearing down the single-family homes around it.

Anonymous said...

La. is also an acceptable abbreviation for lane. The postal service uses Ln so as not to confuse with L.A.(Los Angeles) or LA (Louisiana.)

La is still used in some places, like Hampton Roads, VA.

If it confused you so much, it just means you're an idiot.

Robert Dyer said...

6:39: Actually, a former staff member of George Leventhal did have an apocalyptic scenario like that. He concluded that the houses were too large and expensive to demolish, and he advocated turning them into boarding houses. Mr. Reed declined to divulge what would happen to the wealthy owners of those homes that would place government in control of them. Alien invasion? Maoist revolution? Remember, these are the radical folks telling "Westbard" residents they are "afraid of change" - and these are the folks they employ in their Council offices.

You can't make this stuff up, folks!

Anonymous said...

I would hope those residents were paid handsomely for those properties. However, adding 120 units in an already heavily congested area is ridiculous. Do they even get a parking spot with that purchase? Maybe the 2 new TD banks will seal the deal?

Keep your Urbanization I'll keep my Suburbia!

Anonymous said...

Affordable units? Will we experience a crime spree like Westbard is projected to get?

Anonymous said...

I like how the developer had the planning commission raise the height limit on the site to 100 ft. in the pending Downtown Plan, but they're still going ahead with the approved 70 ft.

Anonymous said...

"Boarding houses"? I'm pretty sure no one said such a thing, other than Dyer, who is notorious for imagining things that were never actually said.

Anonymous said...

8:20 AM boarding houses sound like a nutty idea that Reed would get behind.

Robert Dyer said...

8:20: Fortunately, the article remains on the interlinks as proof it happened.

Robert Dyer said...

8:31: I think it's also truly indicative of the mindset of the Council, in terms of who they hire as staff, as well as their genuine lack of understanding about what makes neighborhoods "great", as Mr. Reed's manifesto so amply demonstrated. Remember, his former employer George Leventhal stated that the suburbs were "a mistake" (despite growing up in the suburbs himself, and running for office in a suburban county!).

Anonymous said...

@ 8:52 AM - Link, Rosie O'Dyer?

@ 8:56 PM - Yet he was elected to the Council (repeatedly), whereas the voters have rejected you, repeatedly.

Anonymous said...

Looks like the Westin Hotel is moving ahead at last, and expanded from the original proposal. More hotel guests for Bethesda's shops, restaurants and bars. Thank you, MoCo Machine!

Anonymous said...

9:43AM "Looks like". Why the weird passive voice?

And you're off topic.

Anonymous said...

Would you rather those 120 households move to Darnestown and then commute down 270 and 495 into their jobs every day?

Anonymous said...

Can you provide such a link for us such that it doesn't get deleted so we can't see the reference? Thanks.

Robert Dyer said...

9:11: Hardly any of the people who voted for him were aware of his comments and personnel decisions. They push whatever button says "Democrat", or whoever the apple-shaped paper tells them to vote for, and that's how we end up with this mess. Engaged and educated voters - along with term limits - are the solution.

Robert Dyer said...

9:43: Duh! I've been reporting about the Connor Building being cleared out for demolition for weeks.

You're thanking the MoCo political cartel for creating an anti-business climate so bad it sank the market for hotels, and causing the project to delay groundbreaking for 5 years?!

Robert Dyer said...

10:43: Yes, and on a completed master plan freeway system.

Anonymous said...

"anti-business climate so bad it sank the market for hotels"

Smh. You realize that the market in Northern Virginia is worse?

Take a look at this Sheraton that broke ground back in 2008:
http://www.bizjournals.com/washington/breaking_ground/2014/02/a-sheraton-resurrected-new-owner-of.html#i1

Anonymous said...

People change, neighborhoods change, master plans change. A single master plan from nearly 60 years ago is not the Bible.

Anonymous said...

@ 10:13 AM - Clingy Shill is clingy.

Anonymous said...

And @12:32 PM is still an idiot.

Anonymous said...

10:43
Don't really care where those 120 households have to commute from. It doesn't justify overcrowding a small town to the point of complete gridlock for the sake of outsiders "convenience".
These are the exact same small, narrow pothole filled roads (Arlington )we had in the early 80's when I went to BCC. The county motto must be - "Build it big and tall, we'll figure the rest out later".

Anonymous said...

Yeah...or "Make agreements now, go back on your word later."

Anonymous said...

Bethesda is a "small town"?

And not caring is a pretty selfish reason and not thinking about the big picture.

Anonymous said...

@11:15 -'doesn't that add to sprawl and violate the smart growth ideas you mentioned?

Anonymous said...

@11:08 to be fair someone here that writes for this blog did say if you aren't a winner you're a loser.

Robert Dyer said...

I would add that we are not obligated to build any particular number of housing units in the County - we control what our population will be, it's not something that that is forced upon us.

Secondly, the actual projections for population increase in MoCo will be accommodated by the number of units that have already been approved in sector plans adopted prior to Westbard or downtown Bethesda. So our officials are now voluntarily blowing up future budgets for their personal short-term benefit of campaign cash from developers.

One needs only refer to George Leventhal's recent acknowledgement, that the added costs to the County of new population exceed the revenue they generate, to know our elected officials are selling us up the river for personal gain and profit.

Just think about it - Leventhal knows Westbard will put us in the red, and he's STILL voting for it!

Anonymous said...

6:34
Completely disagree. It is the county government not seeing the "big picture". You cannot force this kind of overdevelopment onto the already overcrowded local schools and 1950's roads which are basically completely unchanged. Leventhal's brilliant idea is to add more shuttle buses? Seriously, we pay you for nonsensical reasoning like that? Time for a change in government.

Andrea Li said...

Actually there's a good question in here. If we don't add housing at all, would more people still be moving into the area? Wouldn't housing prices just go up because of demand and limited supply?

If we only added housing on the fringes, wouldn't that be against smart growth? Further distances for services, more roads and infrastructure, more traffic, longer commutes, etc.? Maybe if the jobs were pushed out there too it might be better?

Thoughts?

Anonymous said...

I agree, Andrea. It's much smarter to build new housing 1.5 miles from a Metro station, than to build 20 miles from a station.

Anonymous said...

Newsflash! There will always be limited supply. Adding more housing won't change that.