Monday, August 08, 2016

Modern Market opens at Bethesda Row

Be one of the first to try Modern Market, which is celebrating its grand opening today at 4930 Elm Street. The newest dining option at Bethesda Row goes beyond the standard farm-sourced hype to tell you which farms the ingredients on your plate came from.

Modern Market is open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

37 comments:

Anonymous said...
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Anonymous said...
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Anonymous said...

I was there for the soft opening on Friday, as well as lunch today. Food is tasty. Price point is reasonable. I enjoy the options of half salads/sandwiches/pizzas. Management is making a concerted effort to run things smoothly from the get-go. Welcome addition to Bethesda.

Anonymous said...

@12:19 PM - I was there as well on the soft opening and agree with all your points.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for your posts. Can't wait to try it.

Anonymous said...

Plus one for MoCo's nighttime economy initiative. As a joke. Just as much as cvs or BN reducing hours is.

Anonymous said...

Fast casual or table service? I'd like to try it for lunch but I just get take-out and eat at my desk.

Robert Dyer said...

1:56: CVS and Barnes and Noble cutting back hours were devastating indicators of the decline of Bethesda's nighttime economy (and Hans Riemer's effectiveness).

Anonymous said...

THE CVS AS PART OF THE NIGHT TIME ECONOMY? GET A CLUE FUCKTARD!

Anonymous said...

So by that logic then you are in agreement that the opening of Modern Market is a positive indicator of the revival of Bethesda's nighttime economy (and Hans Riemer's effectiveness)?

Anonymous said...

Any urban planner knows you need late night/24 hour businesses for a real, livable vibrant downtown. Bars yes, but not just bars.
The Council and Planning Board took their eye off our crown jewel, downtown Bethesda.

Anonymous said...

So is the complete closure of all Barnes & Noble stores in the District of Columbia, "a devastating indicator of the decline of the District's nighttime economy?

Robert Dyer said...

7:25: Nope - most of the nightclubs and bars people are heading to in the region are in the District. Cutting back late night hours at a bookstore is a clear statement about a weak nighttime economy; a complete closure of a bookstore is not.

Robert Dyer said...

6:58: Modern Market is a restaurant, not a bar or nightclub. I'm surprised you have so much difficulty understanding the difference. No wonder Hans had a meltdown on Facebook this weekend, surrounded by the wreckage of his "nighttime economy " initiative.

Robert Dyer said...

6:17: If people aren't up and out late at night to patronize CVS Pharmacy, it's a good indicator the nighttime economy is tanking. The pharmacy in there was running 24 hours for decades, until Hans Riemer moved here and implemented the policies that caused the Bethesda nighttime economy to collapse. I'm sure he must be embarrassed that his own operative is caught using the taboo "R word" as well.

Anonymous said...

Dude, if i could i'd piss in your cheerios. Robert Dyer you are the worst. Get out of MoCo, all you do is make a fool of yourself. Better start over where no one knows how much of a pathetic ignorant fool you are.

Anonymous said...

CVS is a pharmacy and Barnes and Noble is a book store.

I get the late night Barnes and Noble hours contributes to evening activity in Bethesda Row. But you are saying CVS affects the nighttime economy but a restaurant does not?

Anonymous said...

Did Dyer's blogspot account get hacked? This must be joking.

" If people aren't up and out late at night to patronize CVS Pharmacy, it's a good indicator the nighttime economy is tanking." - Robert Dyer

Anonymous said...

Wait, what? Barnes and Nobles cutting back hours is bad for the nighttime economy but completely closing is better? Ignore the restaurants and bars for a second. Can you clarify this part?

Robert Dyer said...

9:03: Uh, because the restaurant is closed after 10 PM or so, and the CVS pharmacy counter was open 24 hours a day?

9:04: The decline of nightlife in Bethesda is no joke. Ask the folks who lost their jobs as a result. Not funny.

9:06: Never said that. Cutting back late night hours is specifically related to a decline in late night business. Are you a native English speaker? If you were, I wouldn't have to repeat it twice, unless you're playing dumb as an Alinsky tactic: "If the rule is that every letter gets a reply, send 30,000 letters."

Anonymous said...

#ScaryJewishNames

Anonymous said...

Riemer is from California. That explains it all.

Anonymous said...

Wow that's rude. I am 9:06. You said:

"Cutting back late night hours at a bookstore is a clear statement about a weak nighttime economy; a complete closure of a bookstore is not"

Anonymous said...

CVS hardly qualifies as nightlife.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/nightlife

"social activities and forms of entertainment that are available at night in bars, nightclubs, etc."

Anonymous said...

Dyer was born in Virginia. Filthy carpetbagger.

Anonymous said...

Chill, Dyer. You might not be able to pick up OxyContin during the wee hours anymore, but you can still get DMX.

Anonymous said...

9:06PM ---I took it as cutting back hours=weak nighttime economy but complete closure=dead nighttime economy.

I'd think to have a bustling nighttime economy, you'd have to have all types of places open after 10PM. Something to keep people wandering around.

Anonymous said...
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Anonymous said...

Oh ok so dyer agrees that closing completely is worse than reduced hours.

Anonymous said...

He's clearly being sarcastic.

Robert Dyer said...

6:05: "Nighttime economy" covers all economic activity during late nighttime hours. Not just nightlife. 24-hour CVS pharmacy hours fall under that category.

Robert Dyer said...

6:51: Not necessarily - it's just that it's easier to make a correlation to the health of the nighttime economy when a business cuts late night hours, than if it simply closes. Likewise, it's easier to correlate a closure of a nighttime-specific business like a bar or nightclub than if a bookstore closes altogether.

Robert Dyer said...

9:03: Restaurants, unlike bars, are not open late at night. Most are closed by 10 PM (when - what a coincidence - downtown Bethesda gets really quiet and deserted.).

Anonymous said...

Does a restaurant that's open into the evening count towards the nighttime economy?

Flynn said...

Back from a long trip overseas with mediocre internet service!

Hmm interesting to really hear more about your rationale beyond the basic repeated mantra.

Aren't we taught that correlation does not always equal causation. In this case if you are correlating reduced book store hours to a poor nighttime economy, then a closure would seem to correlate as well and even more so.

But didn't you say DC's nighttime economy is doing well? Would that imply that bookstore hours and closings don't correlate to nighttime economy welfare?

Robert Dyer said...

Flynn, again, the difference is that a full closure of a not-nighttime-specific business doesn't clearly correlate to nighttime economy problems. So bookstores closing in DC don't tell us much about DC's nighttime economy - which is booming by all accounts (although I'm not one of those who claim it is on the level of NYC, Vegas, LA or South Beach).

Flynn said...

Can you explain why you think one correlates to you while the other doesn't? One might easily consider a closing to be the extreme end of reduced hours.